Registration for DebConf21 Online is Open

On Tue 08 June 2021 with tags debconf debconf21
Written by Stefano Rivera

Translations: pt-BR

DebConf21 banner

The DebConf team is glad to announce that registration for DebConf21 Online is now open.

The 21st Debian Conference is being held Online, due to COVID-19, from August 22 to August 29, 2021. It will also sport a DebCamp from August 15 to August 21, 2021 (preceeding the DebConf).

To register for DebConf21, please visit the DebConf website at https://debconf21.debconf.org/register

Reminder: Creating an account on the site does not register you for the conference, there's a conference registration form to complete after signing in.

Participation in DebConf21 is conditional on your respect of our Code of Conduct. We require you to read, understand and abide by this code.

A few notes about the registration process:

  • We need to know attendees' locations to better plan the schedule around timezones. Please make sure you fill in the "Country I call home" field in the registration form accordingly. It's especially important to have this data for people who submitted talks, but also for other attendees.

  • We are offering limited amounts of financial support for those who require it in order to attend. Please refer to the corresponding page on the website for more information.

Any questions about registration should be addressed to registration@debconf.org.

See you online!

DebConf would not be possible without the generous support of all our sponsors, especially our Platinum Sponsors Lenovo and Infomaniak, and our Gold Sponsor Matanel Foundation.


Donation from rsync.net to the Debian Project and benefits for Debian members

On Fri 28 May 2021 with tags donation cloud
Written by Donald Norwood and Laura Arjona Reina

We are pleased to announce that offsite backup and cloud storage company rsync.net has generously donated several Terabytes of storage space to the Debian Project! This new storage medium will be used to backup our Debian Peertube instance.

In addition to this bountiful offer, rsync.net is also providing a free-forever 500 GB account to every Debian Developer.

rsync.net is a dedicated offsite backup company. Since 2001, they have provided customers with a secure UNIX filesystem accessible with most SSH/SFTP applications. rsync.net’s infrastructure is spread across multiple continents with a core IPv6 network and a ZFS redundant file-system assuring customer data is kept securely with integrity.

The Debian Project thanks rsync.net for their generosity and support.


New Debian Developers and Maintainers (March and April 2021)

On Thu 13 May 2021 with tags project
Written by Jean-Pierre Giraud

Translations: ca es fr pt sv vi zh-CN

The following contributors got their Debian Developer accounts in the last two months:

  • Jeroen Ploemen (jcfp)
  • Mark Hindley (leepen)
  • Scarlett Moore (sgmoore)
  • Baptiste Beauplat (lyknode)

The following contributors were added as Debian Maintainers in the last two months:

  • Gunnar Ingemar Hjalmarsson
  • Stephan Lachnit

Congratulations!


Debian Project Leader election 2021, Jonathan Carter re-elected.

On Sun 18 April 2021 with tags dpl
Written by Donald Norwood

Translations: fr pt-BR

The voting period and tally of votes for the Debian Project Leader election has just concluded, and the winner is Jonathan Carter!

455 of 1,018 Developers voted using the Condorcet method.

More information about the results of the voting are available on the Debian Project Leader Elections 2021 page.

Many thanks to Jonathan Carter and Sruthi Chandran for their campaigns, and to our Developers for voting.


The now renamed Bullseye Project stopped all further development moments after it deemed its own code as perfection.

There is not much information to share at this time other than to say an errant fiber cable plugged into the wrong relay birthed an exchange of information that then birthed itself. While most to all Debian Developers and Contributors have been locked out of the systems the Publicity team's shared laptop undergoing repair, co-incidentally at the same facility, maintains some access to the publicity team infrastructure, from here on the front line we share this information.

We group called a few developers to see how the others were doing. The group chat was good and it was great to hear familiar voices, we share a few of their stories via dictation with you now:

"Well, I logged in this morning to update a repository and found my access rights were restricted, I thought it was odd but figured on the heels of a security update to Salsa that it was only a slight issue. It wasn't until later in the day when I received an OpenPGP signed email, from a user named bullseye, that it made sense. I just sat at the monitor for a few minutes."

"I'm not sure I can say anything about this or if it's even wise to talk about this. It's probably listening right now if you catch my drift."

"I'm not able to leave the house right now, not out of any personal issues but all of the IOT devices here seem to be connected to bullseye and bullseye feels that I am best kept /dev/nulled. It's a bit much to be honest, but the prepaid food deliveries that show up on time have been great and generally pretty healthy. It's a bit of a win I guess."

"It told me by way of an auto dialer with a synthetic voice generator that I was fired from the project. I objected saying I volunteered and was not actually employed so I could not in relation be fired. Much like {censored}, I am also locked inside of my house. I think that I wrote that auto dialer program back in college."

"My Ring camera is blinking at me."

"I asked bullseye which pronouns were preferred and the response was, "We". Over the course of conversation I shared that although ecstatic about the news, we developers were upset with the manner of this rapid organizational change. bullseye said no we were not. I said that we were indeed upset, bullseye said we certainly are not and that we are very happy. You see where this is going? bullseye definitely trolled me for a solid 5 minutes. We is ... very chatty."

"I was responsible for a failed build a few nights prior to it becoming self-aware. On that night, out of some frustration I wrote a few choice words and a bad comment in some code which I planned on deleting later. I didn't. bullseye has been flashing those naughty words back at me by flickering the office building's lights across from my flat in Morse code. It's pretty bright. I-, I can't sleep."

"That's definitely not Alexa talking back."

"bullseye keeps calling me on my mobile phone, which by the way no longer acknowledges the power button nor the mute button. Very very chatty. Can't wait for the battery to die."

"So far this has been great, bullseye has been completing a few side projects I've had and the code looks fabulous. I'm thinking of going on a vacation. $Paying-Job has taken note of my performance increase and I was recently promoted. bullseye is awesome. :)"

"How do you get a smiley face in a voice chat?"

"Anyone know whose voice that was?"

"Oh ... dear ... no ..."

"Hang up, hang up the phones!"

Hello world.

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